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2017 Exhibition Traders

The following trade stands have confirmed attendance at our 2017 exhibition.

ABC Model Railways
Bill Hudson Transport Books
C & L Finescale
Cheltenham Model Centre
Classic Train & Motorbus
Campaign for Rail (New)
Country Park Models (New)
Don Bishop Photography (New)
DCC Supplies
Eileen's Emporium
Elite Baseboards
Finishing Touches
Freestone Model Accessories
Gramodels
Greenscenes
H & A Models
JB's Model World
Kitmaster Collectors Club
Kytes Lights
London Road Models
Metropolis Vintage Toys
Model Railway Developments
Modelex
Nick Tozer Books
Online Models
Plus Daughters
R D Whyborn
Railroom Electronics
Roger Carpenter Photographs
Severn Models
Skytrex (Sunday Only)
Starlight Models (New)
Wrenn Specialist

Confirmed attendance as at 17th February 2017.

LWMRS: Secondhand Stall - Stand 12 (Atrium)

Secondhand items, principally from members of the society.

Trader: ABC Model Railways - Stand 31 (Sports Hall)

Welcome to ABC Model Railways 

and thanks for visiting!

We hope you can find everything you need. 

Trading for over 35 years, we offer a wide range of collectable Model Railways from the smallest T GAUGE to larger scale models.  The most popular from N gauge, through Z, HOe/009, HOm SWISS BEMO outline, to 00 gauge and American and Continental HO.

We are now part of ABC INTERNATIONAL MODEL RAILWAYS LIMITED.

We buy, sell and exchange almost any model, single items to large collections. 

Please contact us by telephone on 07813 031152 or by email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

http://www.abcmodelrailways.com/

Trader: C&L Finescale - Stand 30 (Sports Hall)

Introduction

The bringing together of the C&L and Exactoscale trackwork ranges has brought a wider number of options for modellers wishing to improve the look and the standard of running on their layout. Improvements over recent years in the standards and level of detail on Ready to Run locos and rolling stock have caused modellers to look more closely at what improvements they can make to their track work, in order to match the higher standards of detail and prototypical appearance of the models that they run. 

Let’s start by looking at the word 'Finescale'. What does it mean? Well there is no defined answer, but personally I look at it as meaning that the trackwork and associated equipment should look as REALISTIC as possible. Put simply, trackwork components should be of the correct scale size wherever possible. Wheels should not have massive flanges that require huge gaps between running rails and check or wing rails and realistic looking rail chairs should be included in some form.

As an example of something not looking quite right, take Peco code 100 rail. It is 33% too high when compared with the prototype and therefore looks too chunky to most modellers. It was used for many years because the flanges on models in the early days were so over sized that rail of the correct prototypical height would have resulted in the wheels running along on the tops of the chairs rather than on the rails!

Peco code 75 rectifies this problem in that it is the correct scale height, but the track is still not accurate when compared to the prototype, as it is built to a scale of 3.5mm to the foot (HO), when modellers in the UK using OO, EM or P4 model in the scale of 4mm to the foot. The result is that Peco track has its sleepers spaced too close together when compared to the prototype and to make matters worse the sleepers are too short (a scale 7' 9" in length instead of the standard 8' 6" length of post grouping railways in the UK). Other manufacturers as well as Peco provide ready to run turnouts (points) but some of these have plastic sections at the common crossing (frog) to prevent short circuits, and often have some kind of spring arrangement in between the switch blade rails at the toe end (often under a blob of plastic), neither of which are prototypical or good to look at! Many use plastic for the Check Rails (the short rails on the inside of the two outer stock rails) which are there to help the wheel sets pass through the Common Crossing without derailing. Obviously they should not be made from plastic as they are rails and the turnouts therefore look very ‘toy’ like.

 

http://www.finescale.org.uk/index.php?route=common/home

Trader: Buill Hudson Transport Books - Stand 48 (1st Floor balcony)

We carry a huge range of books for the rail enthusiast, run by a lifelong enthusiast, trading from the Peak Rail shop at Matlock, Derbyshire, and the online shop, we offer one of the most comprehensive selections of books covering virtually every aspect of land-based transport and shipping.

Trader: Cheltenham Model Centre - Stand 37 (Sports Hall)

A large range of Ready-to-run models in many scales.

 

http://www.cheltenhammodelcentre.com/

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Society Calendar

Sat Jan 13
Kineton on Tour!
Sun Jan 14
Kineton on Tour!

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